April Fools' Day Hangover Concert
Apr
2
7:00pm 7:00pm

April Fools' Day Hangover Concert

Double Bassist James Rapport programs an post-April Fools Day concert in Vienna. Program includes the world premiere of Whack-A-Mole USA by Russell Steinberg for flute, viola, and double bass, plus Steinberg's Postscript for violin and bass, and music by P. D.Q. Bach, Henri Kling, Linus Köhring, Michael Paulus, Wolfgang Schröder, Astrid Spitznagel

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Shostakovich and Prokofiev Series 5
Feb
15
7:00pm 7:00pm

Shostakovich and Prokofiev Series 5

  • Encino, CA Address confirmed after reservation (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Week 5 February 15—Russian Symphonists
Shostakovich Symphony No. 7
Prokofiev Symphony No. 5

Series Discount Before December 1, 2016
Click for Reservations

The destinies of Shostakovich and Prokofiev were inextricably linked to the repressive Soviet regime under Stalin. Their compositions often had dramatic political ramifications. They both feared for their lives from criticism instigated by Stalin. Their natural modernist style was labeled "formalist." But even when they wrote in a more accessible style, they were labeled "deviant" or "vulgar." Nevertheless both Soviet and world audiences identified and thrilled to their works.   

In eight evenings, we will explore their music and discuss these fascinating factors.   Open to all curious music lovers; no previous knowledge of Shostakovich and Prokofiev or technical musical understanding is required.

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Jan
28
1:00pm 1:00pm

UpBeat Live Schoenberg Piano Concerto

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Jan
27
7:00pm 7:00pm

UpBeat Live Schoenberg Piano Concerto

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Jan
26
7:00pm 7:00pm

UpBeat Live Schoenberg Piano Concerto

Los Angeles Philharmonic

Gustavo Dudamel, conductor

Emanuel Ax, piano

PROGRAM

SCHOENBERG: Accompaniment to a Film Scene (c. 9 minutes)

MOZARTPiano Concerto No. 14, K. 449 (c. 25 minutes)Program Notes

SCHOENBERGPiano Concerto (c. 21 minutes)Schoenberg: Piano ConcertoProgram Notes

MOZARTSymphony No. 31, K. 297 ("Paris") (c. 17 minutes)Program Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ABOUT THIS PERFORMANCE

Arnold Schoenberg revered the great composers of the past: Beethoven, Brahms, etc., but most of all Mozart. He believed that Mozart’s aesthetic would always apply in music, regardless of the use of traditional tonality.

So while Schoenberg experimented with and then codified atonality, he was intent on retaining traditional forms and principles, such as clarity, balance and proportion, to name only a few.

Despite the title, Accompaniment to a Film Scene was not composed for a film or scene. It does use Schoenberg’s very adaptable 12-tone system as does his Piano Concerto, which is in four continuous movements.

This program challenges you to hear both Schoenberg and Mozart in new ways.

Programs, artists, dates, prices and availability subject to change.

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